Yearlong English Courses

English 9: Survey of English and Literacies

This course introduces the foundational skills of close reading, critical writing, and public speaking. The course takes a genre-approach (short stories, poetry, novels, nonfiction essays, dramatic scripts) and emphasizes skills in reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, performing, and doing. Study skills are highlighted, as are rudimentary research skills. Students are taught to think with precision, specificity, and clarity in order to engage in sophisticated analysis. Writing assignments range from short, analytical papers to a variety of personal and creative pieces. This work ultimately culminates in the students’ understanding of how to construct and logically develop a formal argument in a sustained essay of three to five pages in length. Students will study literary terms and devices and varied genres/poetic forms in order to develop voice and authority in their own writing. Special attention is paid to grammar, punctuation and sentence structure. Students will also be introduced to basic public speaking skills that culminate in the presentation of an expository speech. [One credit.]

English 10: American Literacies

This course develops and reinforces students’ capacities for critical thinking, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, performing, and doing and builds awareness of how meaning is constructed through various. American experiences. The main goals of the course are to study the ways in which authors, playwrights, filmmakers, and visionaries have captured and shaped America’s national identity over the past four centuries; to cultivate students’ enjoyment and comprehension of literature and media; and to introduce them with the skills they need to be confident, empowered readers, writers, thinkers, and makers of meaning ready to work at the university level. Students develop their written voices in a variety of genres, and instructors emphasize writing as a process. Aspects of argumentation are introduced and advanced through a persuasive speech while research and skills are further developed. [One credit.]

English 11: Global Literacies and Advanced Composition

This course refines students’ capacities for critical thinking, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, performing, and doing and builds awareness of how meaning is constructed through global literacies. The course emphasizes literacies from around the globe including, but not limited to Asia, Europe, Africa, North and South America, and Oceania. The main goals of the course are to study the ways in which authors, playwrights, filmmakers, and visionaries have captured and shaped identities around the world; to nurture students’ enjoyment and comprehension of literature and media; and to provide them with the skills they need to be confident, empowered readers, writers, thinkers, and makers of meaning ready to work at the university level. Students develop their written voices in a variety of genres, and instructors emphasize writing as a process. Aspects of argumentation are reinforced and advanced through public speech while research and study skills are tightened. [One credit.]


AP English: AP Language and Composition : World Cultures (Grade 11)

This course is designed to challenge students as readers, writers, and thinkers by exposing them to a variety of genres and by engaging them in multiple modes of writing. The primary focus is the understanding of literary and rhetorical techniques. The course will be organized thematically, with fiction and nonfiction texts spanning both genres and historical time periods to allow students to gain a broad understanding of the ways in which various writers use rhetoric to approach a range of issues in multiple cultures. In addition to novels, plays, short stories, and poetry, texts include nonfiction essays, editorials, speeches, and memoirs. We will also examine images and film as texts, extending our interpretive and analytical reach to art, photography, political cartoons, advertisements, documentaries, and feature films. Students will engage with these texts through multiple modes of writing, including personal reflection, research papers, persuasive essays, rhetorical analysis, and critical analysis. [Prerequisite: Departmental approval. One credit.]


AP English: Literature and Composition (Grade 12)

This is a college-level course for students who have demonstrated a keen interest in literature and success in analytical writing. The course is designed to further cultivate those students’ critical capacities as readers and writers through studying a wide variety of authors, styles, and literary periods. Classes are predominantly discussion-based, with particular emphasis on the finer points of literary craftsmanship; students should expect 30-40 pages of nightly reading and frequent writing assignments. Students are evaluated on the basis of their mastery of content and terminology, the precision and clarity of their analytical writing, and the originality of a variety of forms of creative expression. While the course will prepare students for the Advanced Placement exam, its larger aim is to cultivate in them an appreciation of the lifelong value of engaged reading and lively critical thinking. This course is open to juniors or seniors who have earned an A- or higher in their current English class and received the teacher's recommendation. [Prerequisite: Departmental approval. One credit.]


Journalism I

Journalism I is designed to give students an introduction to several key journalistic skills and topics including: responsibilities of being a journalist, journalistic ethics and law, news writing, features writing, opinion writing, sports writing, becoming a more powerful, more readable writer, interviewing, developing a nose for news, covering a beat, copy editing, writing headlines and photography basics. Many of the lessons presented in class will focus on real-world examples, using both professional publications and The Spectator as starting points for discussion. No previous experience is required; personal integrity and an eagerness to learn are required. After taking this course, students will be eligible to join and write for the newspaper at any time. Students will try their hand in all genres of newspaper writing during the year. Students will be graded according to effort, meeting deadlines, and mastery of class topics. [One credit, does not count toward English graduation requirement.]


Journalism II

This course will give students the opportunity to learn about journalism firsthand by producing a monthly newspaper and a corresponding news website. Every student focU.S.es on producing the print publication for one half of the year and gains skills and experience working on the digital publication for the second half of the year. Students write in a variety of genres, from straight news writing to features and opinion writing. Students will cover beats around the school and will have real input into what goes into print or on to the web each month. Because of the team-and deadline-driven nature of publication, students on the newspaper must be willing to communicate proactively and openly about the status of their ongoing work with their classmates and the teacher and show a real commitment to meeting deadlines consistently. The class will help students develop the following skills: effective and powerful writing for publication, multimedia journalism, time management, making ethical decisions in a real-world setting, working with others to get jobs done, effective reporting, effective interviewing, and giving and receiving feedback. Students will utilize their basic photography, page design, and graphic skills introduced in Journalism I, while enhancing, and building upon those skills throughout the year. The publication process will afford opportunities to explore some concrete and theoretical topics of journalism, based upon the national trends or stories of the day. [Prerequisite: Journalism I. One credit, does not count toward English graduation requirement.]


Advanced Journalism

Advanced Journalism students take leadership roles in either print or digital concentrations as Editor in Chief, Managing Editor, Web Editor, and Social Media Director, to name a few. Students take leadership roles in the management and execution of assignments, both digital and print, but also serve as writers and reporters to present stories in a number of mediums. Leadership, project management and brand development/management are skill sets taught in both courses. Again, students will be required to complete at least seven major projects -- the monthly print publications or web/multimedia content. [Prerequisite: Journalism II. One credit, does not count toward English graduation requirement.]


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